Pet Advice Cat Behaviour

Published on December 5th, 2017 | by Debbie Martin

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Cat Behaviour’s Explained – Infographic

Following on from our previous post on ‘What is your cat trying to tell you?’ we have been sent this fabulous animated infographic by Sainsbury’s Bank – Money Matters, and don’t forget to check out their site for other useful tips and guides an a wide variety of subjects.






Rubbing against your legs or furniture

This is my home, and I scent things to find my way around.

Showing you its behind

Don’t be offended, I’m just being friendly. We cats say hello to each other by sniffing tails, just like dogs.

Ears forward

I’m pleased to see you. If you hold out your hand, I might give it a bump to say hello (or a sniff if I’m shy).

Slow closing of eyes/blinking

You’re getting a kiss. If you copy me, I might just do it again. If I’m in the mood.

Ears upright, sitting
up and alert

I’m listening intently. Was it a bird or a mouse? I’m not sure, but I’m off to find out.




Kneading

I’m getting comfy. Kneading you makes me feel good, as I think about how I used to knead my mum.

Rolling on back to expose stomach

I trust you, but watch your fingers if you decide to give me a tickle; I might be in the mood to play.





Back hunched up with tail and fur on end

I’m being defensive. I’m puffing my hair out to make myself look bigger, so whatever I’m scared of leaves me alone.

Cat in a box/bag

This might look silly to you, but it makes me feel safe; I can see you, but you can’t see me!


Cat in a box/bag

This might look silly to you, but it makes me feel safe; I can see you, but you can’t see me!

Cat ‘gift’

I’ve brought you a mouse to try and teach you how to hunt. See what a good hunter I am.

It’s your turn now.


Purring

I purr because of most things (dinner, strokes, sitting in sunshine), but mainly because you’ve given me some form of ‘contact’ and I like it.



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About the Author

Debbie Martin has worked at Beeston Animal Health for over five years, having previously worked as a nurse in equine and small animal practice. Although generally involved with aspects of marketing these days and putting her psychology degree to good use, she still has a great depth of up to date knowledge in all creatures great and small. Debbie lives at home with her partner and two children and spends much of her spare time looking after her horses, dogs and cats or at the home farm with the cows, sheep and turkeys.



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